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Geoffrey Udall Prize

The Geoffrey Udall Prize for Paediatric Medicine is awarded annually by the Wheelwrights Charitable Trust for work by a student at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, who has made both clinical and practical observation in a particular field associated with handicap. The Winner receives a framed Citation and a purse of £500.

Dr Udall was born in 1917 and educated at The Downs and Bryanston Schools and Head Boy at Bryanston. He subsequently became Chairman of Governors of both schools.

He considered a theatrical career but instead went to St John’s College, Cambridge and read Medicine. He qualified at St Thomas’s Hospital in 1943 and immediately volunteered for the RAMC and was posted to Burma. Returned to General Practice.

In 1962 he joined St Bartholomew’s Hospital and rose to become Reader and Consultant Paediatrician retiring from those posts in 1982.

He was Master of The Worshipful Company of Wheelwrights in 1970 - the Tercentenary Year.

On his death in 1994 he left a legacy to the Wheelwrights to be used to fund an annual prize.

He bequeathed his family’s estate and three acre walled garden at Beech Hill, near Reading, to the charity, Society for Horticultural Therapy and Rural Training of which he was founding Chairman.

Since 1989 known as Thrive and the Estate is the Charity’s national headquarters and flagship garden to this day.

Before his death, he made provision in his will, and this bequest continues to be instrumental in enabling Thrive to bring the benefits of gardening to increasing numbers of disabled people.

The Geoffrey Udall Award 2016
Harriette Pearson

Angelman Syndrome

We were delighted to present The Geoffrey Udall Award for 2016 to Harriette Pearson a final year medical student, who has been interested in paediatrics throughout her time at university and who submitted an essay on Angelman Syndrome a rare condition amongst children with severe learning difficulties.

 

In 2013, Harriette pioneered a volunteering project on the paediatric wards of The Royal London Hospital, with medical students providing evening and weekend play sessions for children, teenagers and their families. The group has provided play to over 1000 children over the three years it has been running, which led to Harriette receiving a 'Point of Light' award from Prime Minister Cameron in recognition of her volunteer work.

 

Harriette continues to volunteer in the hospital, as well as having undertaken self-organised study modules there in paediatric oncology, and adolescent care. More recently, she has spent five weeks at Great Ormond Street Hospital studying in the cardiology department. In addition, she has spent time implementing a 'health education' workshop at a rural children's home in India whilst teaching anatomy practicals to first year students. 

 

During her work towards the Geoffrey Udall Award, Harriette spent time at Stephen Hawking school in Limehouse, a primary school for pupils with severe learning difficulties.This gave her an insight into the multitude of problems faced by the pupils there, and she chose to focus on 'Angelman Syndrome' as her essay topic. After completing her observations, Harriette was asked to give a presentation to the community paediatricians in East London on this rare condition. 

 

Outside of medicine, Harriette enjoys walking trips with the university's 'Alpine' club, practices yoga and is a keen runner. She is currently training for her third marathon in October 2016, and hopes to achieve the thus far elusive sub 4 hour time.'

2014 Winner
Miss Zoe Obianuju GB-Dumaka, BSc (Hons)

“Exploring the impact of Assistive Technologies in Children with Motor Disabilities”

Zoe is a final year medical student at Barts, is passionate about working with children and as such, is considering a career in Paediatrics. She undertook an Intercalated BSc degree in Global Public Health & Primary Care, with specific research into interventions for survivors of paediatric cancer. The Wheelwrights' Essay Prize will allow her to further pursue her interest in this field. In her spare time she works part-time as a student teacher. She has undertaken volunteer work in schools for children with disabilities, and for the past 3 years has volunteered part-time as an academic mentor and football coach for girls aged 11-14, as part of a mentoring charity serving schools in less privileged areas of East London.

Upon completion of her studies in March 2015, she will be travelling to Johannesburg, South Africa to carry out elective work in Paediatrics for 6 weeks to gain further hands-on experience in the field.

The Master presenting the Award to Zoe

2013 Winner:
Mr Bhavin Kawa

Bhavin’s winning paper was on the subject of Paediatric Spinal Cord Injury.

Born in East London, Bhavin graduated from Brunel University with a 1st class honours in Biomedical Sciences. He is currently a final year medical student at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry and hopes to specialise in Paediatrics.

Outside of medicine, Bhavin’s interests include astronomy and video games.

 

 

 

 

2012 Winner:
No prize awarded

2011 Winner:
Dr Mizanul Hoque

Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Autosomal Recessive Diseases and Consanguineous Marriages

“A very thoughtful essay looking at the risk factors for inherited diseases affecting mobility”

2010 Winner:
Miss Sophie Sakmann

Brucker Biofeedback Therapy for Children with Cerebral Palsy

“An excellent essay based on exploring and observing an alternative therapy for cerebral palsy”